The interview #sol19

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The fourth graders at my school have been exploring different careers and interviewed a variety of community members to learn more about specific careers.  To prepare for this event, all of the students spent a lot of time developing questions for their individual interviews.  I was asked to participate, but not as an educator.  Instead, I was asked to participate as the President of the Virginia State Reading Association.  While it’s not a career, my role in VSRA is related to my career and I was excited to share about this experience and how it connects with being a reading specialist.

The student who interviewed me was not one I work with regularly.  This student usually seems pretty quiet, but after the formal part of the interview, he started to chat about reading and writing.  As I listened to him, he reminded me so much of myself at that age.  He eagerly described the different books that he liked to read (he’s a huge Lord of the Rings fan) and that he also liked to read his own stories.  We had a long conversation during the reception held just after the interviews.  As I munched on a cookie and sipped tea, I learned a lot about B and shared about my own life as a reader and writer.  I realized that while I know the names of just about every child in my school (we have about 125 kids), I don’t really know a lot about the kids who don’t come to my classroom for additional support in reading.   As I thought about this, I decided that I wanted to make a more concerted effort to connect with the kids outside of my classroom so that I don’t miss out on great conversations like the one with B today.

2 thoughts on “The interview #sol19

  1. Fran Haley

    The thing I love best about education is that we come away changed by these encounters with students. I also love that this one likes reading his own stories – therein lies the key to great writing. Your slice is a rich reminder of the vital nature of connections not only between students and teachers but from human to human. We are meant to share.

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  2. Darin Johnston

    >As I thought about this, I decided that I wanted to make a more concerted effort to connect with the kids outside of my classroom so that I don’t miss out on great conversations like the one with B today.<

    I love this sentence. It stands out, as if bolded, tell us, "This is my plan. It will be one of success." Well, perhaps a little over the top, but I love that idea of making that time to know the humans in our school. As we've moved to consolidate, suddenly, I "know" a lot more kids, but yet, it's harder to get to know them because there are 80 vs 30 per class. All this means, is that I have 50 new friends to make! LOL!

    Good luck with your connections and thank you for sharing! 🙂

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